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Angry Inuk

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Nov 14 in Gibsons, Nov 16 in Sechelt. Angry Inuk gives voice to Inuit hunters in tiny remote arctic communities who are negatively affected by animal rights groups protesting against the Canadian east coast seal hunt a thousand kilometres away..Canada, 2016, 82min.  Director: Alethea Arnaquq-Baril.

 'Angry Inuk' screening Mon Nov 14 at the Gibsons Heritage Playhouse, and Wed Nov 16 in Sechelt at the SC Art Centre

 

MORE ABOUT THE FILM

"in the past, qallunaat [white] filmmakers for a very long time now, a hundred years, have portrayed Inuit as very happy little simple people, sometimes in a condescending way. So the title is kind of poking fun at that stereotype of us and I think part of that stereotype exists because of the way we express anger." — director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril

In her film Angry Inuk, Inuit director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril joins a new tech-savvy generation of Inuit as they campaign to challenge long-established perceptions of seal hunting. Though most commercial sealing is conducted by Inuit in the Arctic, anti-sealing activism has created a perception of the industry that denies their central role in the sealskin market. To reinsert themselves into the international discussion, these Inuit activists must inconvenience the fundraising campaigns of animal groups by using all the tricks in the social media book, and invent some of their own along the way, like “sealfies.” Seal meat is a staple food for Inuit, and many of the pelts are sold to offset the extraordinary cost of hunting. Inuit are spread across extensive lands and waters, and their tiny population is faced with a disproportionate responsibility for protecting the environment. They are pushing for a sustainable way to take part in the global economy, but in opposition stands an army of well-funded activists and well-meaning celebrities.

MEDIA coverage
 
NOW Magazine - 4/5 stars, "Activist cinema at its best."

The Current: 'Angry Inuk' argues anti-seal hunt campaign hurts Canadian Inuit life  Interview with Alethea Arnaquq-Baril

'Angry Inuk' wins audience award and $25K prize at Hot Docs festival.

 Trailer

Angry Inuk - Trailer